Accessibility Toolbar Accessibility Statement
A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Initial Public Consultation and Participation

February 2010

Please note, the Consultation exercise has closed. This page is for information only. The Consultation Report can be found at www.tameside.gov.uk/lits

Introduction

Tameside Council is developing a transport strategy for Longdendale and the surrounding local area.

A budget of £100m has been identified by the Association of Greater Manchester Authorities for implementation of alternative proposals to the Mottram to Tintwistle bypass. To deliver a broad based fully integrated transport alternative, the Council will need approval, support and in some cases additional funding contributions from other organisations such as:-

  • Highways Agency.
  • Bus and Rail Operating Companies.
  • Greater Manchester Passenger Transport Executive.
  • Derbyshire County Council.
  • High Peak Borough Council.
  • Association of Greater Manchester Authorities.

A range of problems, issues and typical options have been identified for further consideration. Your views and ideas are very important to us and there are several opportunities for you to contribute throughout the exhibition.

Please get involved

Background

Location Plan of the Longdendale Integrated Transport Strategy
Click on the image to view a larger version

In June 2007, a Public Inquiry commenced in connection with the Mottram to Tintwistle Bypass and the Glossop Spur. During the inquiry, problems were identified with the Highway’s Agency’s evidence, which resulted in the inquiry being suspended.

Later that year, the Government published the Nichols Report, recommending changes to the approach used to estimate the costs of major highway schemes. The Highways Agency reviewed the cost estimate for the Mottram to Tintwistle Bypass in line with this advice, and found that the estimate increased from approximately £200m to £300m. As a result, the bypass scheme was deemed unaffordable, and was subsequently withdrawn by the Highways Agency in July 2009.

In July 2009, Tameside Council approved the development of an integrated transport strategy for Longdendale. The development of this strategy is the subject of this public exhibition and consultation.

 Problems and Issues

Traffic and Congestion

The A57 and the A628 are heavily congested, resulting in long traffic queues throughout the week, including evenings and weekends. Serious traffic congestion occurs during the peak periods, leading to long delays for motorists.

We feel that the impact of this heavy traffic and congestion is not limited to the A57 and A628. Motorists often use shortcuts and seek alternative routes through residential areas, increasing the overall impact upon the local community.

Map showing the amount of congestion on roads in the Longdendale area
Click on the image to view a larger version

Congestion on Ashworth LaneCongestion on Mottram Moor Congestion on Long Lane near Broadbottom

Air Quality, Noise, Dirt and Dust

Heavy flows of ‘stop/start’ traffic along the A57 and A628 have a negative impact on the local community in a number of ways. This includes detrimental effects relating to air quality, noise, dirt and dust.

We monitor air quality at a number of sites across the Borough and have found that the level of nitrogen dioxide is higher in this congested area than recorded elsewhere in Tameside.

Congestion on Stalybridge Road

Queuing towards Mottram Junction

Safety, Accessibility and Quality Of Life

We feel that the traffic congestion and associated environmental problems have an impact upon the general quality of life of residents living close to the A57 and A628.

Narrow footway and poor servicing in HollingworthRoads with heavy flows of traffic can create a barrier for the community, making it difficult for residents to make trips to places such as schools, the GP, local shops and employment.

Heavy traffic can also create road safety problems for residents. In particular, vulnerable members of the community may feel intimidated by traffic when walking in the villages and may find it difficult to cross the roads.

In addition, we feel that many residents do not see cycling as an attractive option because of the volume of traffic using the corridor.

Pedestrian crossing point in Hollingworth

The Economy

Good transport links are important to the local and regional economy as they support economic growth and regeneration.

We feel that journey time delays and heavy traffic reduce the area’s attractiveness to potential investors. This in turn reduces the employment opportunities available to the local community.

Congestion can also impact upon existing businesses within Tameside, Glossop and beyond, as journey times are increased due to queuing traffic.

Vacant industrial premises in Glossop

Traffic congestion on Mottram Moor Delayed local commercial traffic

Public Transport, Walking and Cycling

Bus shelter on Stalybridge Road, MottramWe know that the traffic congestion on Longdendale’s major and minor roads can increase journey times and reduce the reliability and appeal of the local bus services.

We are also aware that if the local rail station facilities were to provide a more welcoming environment, more people would be encouraged to make greater use of rail travel.

We are concerned that heavy traffic can act as a barrier when encouraging people to walk or cycle. Improving air quality and reducing traffic levels can make the area more attractive to pedestrians and cyclists.

We feel that the range of alternatives to driving are currently limited and need improving. We are particularly concerned that non-drivers can find it harder to access employment and key services such as education, entertainment, leisure activities and health care.

Hattersley Railway Station

The Built Environment, Street Scene and Natural Environment

Mottram conservation areaThe village of Mottram is a designated conservation area because of its unique architecture and historic buildings. We feel that the volume of traffic now dominates and has a negative impact upon the village’s overall character.

In some places the appearance of the street scene (which includes the pedestrian footways, signage, bins, benches and lighting) is cluttered and does not complement the surrounding historic buildings. We feel that we could improve such aspects of the street scene and create a more appealing environment for pedestrians.

Whilst not in the conservation area, similar issues exist in the other villages in Longdendale.

We feel the traffic congestion in the area discourages people from walking, cycling and using public transport.

Consequently this could have a damaging impact on the natural environment.

Typical street scene in Hollingworth

We are interested to hear any comments and suggestions you may have about the transport problems in the area.

The Strategy

Taking into account the key problems and issues we have previously identified, we feel that the Integrated Transport Strategy should achieve the following in the Longdendale villages:-

Reduce the impact of traffic on air quality.

  • Reduce delay to traffic on the highway network by reducing congestion.
  • Reduce journey times on the local bus network and improve the service provided by buses.
  • Improve the opportunity for increased rail travel by not only improving access to local rail stations but also improving the service provided by trains.
  • Deliver street scene improvements and introduce improved pedestrian and cycling measures on the highway network.
  • Reduce the impact of traffic congestion for the benefit of the local and sub-regional economies.
  • Improve access within Longdendale and locations beyond to services and amenities such as education, employment, health, leisure and shopping.
  • Improve road user safety.
  • Minimise the impact of traffic on the built and natural environments.
  • Encourage less car use through education, publicity campaigns, training and ‘soft measures’ such as walking buses, cycle training and pedestrian safety campaigns.

We are interested to hear any comments and suggestions you may have about the transport strategy.

Typical Public Transport Options

Three typical public transport options have been set out, the delivery of which would also require the involvement of the bus and rail operating companies, the Greater Manchester Passenger Transport Executive, the Association of Greater Manchester Authorities, the Highways Agency and Derbyshire County Council.

Option 1

Map illustrating Option 1
Click on the image to view a larger version

Option 1 consists of:

  • Increased frequency of bus services on selected routes, running throughout the day, seven days a week, between Glossop, Hyde, Ashton-under-Lyne and beyond.
  • Initiatives to influence travel behaviour and encourage the use of alternatives to driving. Examples of such measures (known as “Smarter Choices”) are:-
    • travel plans.
    • walking buses.
    • travel awareness campaigns.
  • Increased opportunities for pedestrians to cross roads safely and feel less intimidated by traffic when using footways.
  • Increased opportunities to encourage cyclists to use the local highway network.

Option 2

Map illustrating Option 2
Click on the image to view a larger version

Option 2 consists of:

  • All measures described in Option 1.
  • Additional measures to improve bus travel (where appropriate) including:-
    • bus lanes.
    • improved bus stops.
    • raised platforms to improve access onto vehicles.
    • improved timetable information.

Option 3

Map illustrating Option 3
Click on the image to view a larger version

Option 3 consists of:

  • All measures as described in Option 2.
  • An increase in the frequency of rail services.
  • Rail station improvements including:-
    • park and ride facilities.
    • waiting facilities.
    • bus interchanges.
    • timetable information.
    • attractive pedestrian routes to and from the stations.

Typical Highway Options

Two typical highway options have been set out, the delivery of which would also require the involvement of the bus and rail operating companies, the Greater Manchester Passenger Transport Executive, the Association of Greater Manchester Authorities, the Highways Agency, High Peak Borough Council and Derbyshire County Council.

Option 4

Map illustrating Option 4
Click on the image to view a larger version

Option 4 consists of:

  • A new dual-carriageway from the M67 terminal roundabout passing beneath Roe Cross Road through a tunnel and linked to a new junction at Mottram Moor.
  • A new single carriageway link from the A57 (T) Mottram Moor to a new junction on the A57 Brookfield.

In addition, selected roads within the Mottram and Hollingworth area, and beyond, together with selected roads in Derbyshire would benefit from:-

  • complementary bus measures (please see Option 2 for details).
  • complementary highway measures (please see lower down for details).

Option 5

Map illustrating Option 5
Click on the image to view a larger version

Option 5 consists of:

  • A new dual-carriageway travelling from the M67 terminal roundabout, to a new junction west of Roe Cross Road.
  • The main dual-carriageway would pass beneath Roe Cross Road through a tunnel and link to a new junction at Mottram Moor.
  • A new single-carriageway link to Roe Cross Road north of the main dual-carriageway.
  • A new single carriageway link between the A57 (T) Mottram Moor and a new junction at A57 Brookfield.

In addition, selected roads within the Mottram and Hollingworth area, and beyond, together with selected roads in Derbyshire would benefit from:-

  • complementary bus measures (please see Option 2 for details).
  • complementary highway measures (please see lower down for details).

Complementary Highway Measures

Within the options described earlier, the strategy would incorporate a number of complementary highway measures in the local area.

The plan below illustrates the routes that are likely to benefit from these measures.

Map illustrating the complementary highway measures
Click on the image to view a larger version

These are likely to include:-

  • Traffic calming measures.
  • Traffic management measures.
  • Junction improvements.
  • Road safety measures.
  • Pedestrian crossing facilities.
  • Cycle improvements.
  • Improved signage and road markings.
  • Environmental weight restriction.
  • Street scene improvements in key areas.
  • Speed reduction (20mph / 30 mph limits).
  • Footway improvements.

Typical Combined Public Transport and Highway Option

Taking into account the measures from both the highway and public transport options we have identified a typical combined transport option which is based on Option 3 and Option 5 and is described below. The delivery of this would also require the involvement of the bus and rail operating companies, the Greater Manchester Passenger Transport Executive, the Association of Greater Manchester Authorities, the Highways Agency, High Peak Borough Council and Derbyshire County Council.

Option 6

Map illustrating Option 6
Click on the image to view a larger version

Option 6 consists of:

Public Transport Elements

Increased frequency of bus services on selected routes, running throughout the day, seven days a week, between Glossop, Hyde, Ashton-under-Lyne and beyond.

  • Initiatives to influence travel behaviour and encourage the use of alternatives to driving.
  • Increased opportunities for pedestrians to cross roads safely and feel less intimidated by traffic when using footways.
  • Increased opportunities to encourage cyclists to use the local highway network.
  • Additional measures to improve bus travel, where appropriate.
  • An increase in the frequency of rail services.
  • Rail station improvements.

Highway Elements

  • A new dual-carriageway travelling from the M67 terminal roundabout, to a new junction west of Roe Cross Road.
  • The main dual-carriageway would pass beneath Roe Cross Road through a tunnel and link to a new junction at Mottram Moor.
  • A new single-carriageway link to Roe Cross Road north of the main dual-carriageway.
  • A new single carriageway link between the A57 (T) Mottram Moor and a new junction at A57 Brookfield.
  • Complementary highway measures on selected roads within the Mottram and Hollingworth area, and beyond, together with selected roads in Derbyshire.

We are interested to hear any comments and suggestions you may have about the transport options.

What Happens Next?

The first step in the process is to review and feedback the outcome of the public consultation. This would then allow Tameside Council to develop the strategy further to establish an initial position.

Detailed development of the strategy including additional consultation would then follow in accordance with the necessary procedures and statutory requirements

Given the wide range of proposals being considered in the transport strategy, individual measures would be developed so that they could be implemented independently where appropriate. This would allow the delivery of some measures in the short term whilst others, which may involve longer statutory procedures, would be delivered in the medium or long term.

Thank you for Viewing this Information

Related Items
Minimise webchat tab
Customer Services Live Web Chat
Customer Services Live Web Chat