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Waterloo and Taunton War Memorial


Waterloo and Taunton War MemorialSite

At the junction of Oldham Road and Taunton Road, next to the Dog and Partridge Public House.

Description

A four-sided column made of what appears to be Portland Stone, standing on three steps. A plant holder has been placed on each side of the second step, encasing the top step. The structure is surrounded by low railings.

On each side of the column there is a sword cut into the stone at the top, and beneath, a wreath. There are four bronze panels, bearing 87 names from the First World War, and 28 from the Second World War.

The architect was Percy Howard and, in its report of the unveiling, the Ashton Reporter described the monument as being of simple but dignified design.

History

Mr Maurice Lees, Mayor of the Manor, unveiled the memorial on St George's Day (23 April), 1921, in front of 3,000 people.

The procession left the junction of Ney Street and Oldham Road led by the Manchester Regiment band and Firing party, and featuring the Mayor and Mayoress of Ashton (Councillor and Mrs Henry Greenwood), schoolchildren, etc. the representatives of the churches were led by the Salvation Army Band.

Councillor E. Williamson, Chairman of the War Memorial Committee gave a speech, and Mr R Thornley read the lesson God Is Our Refuge and Our Strength. The Rev T Brian Castle then took prayers.

After Mr Lees unveiled the memorial, the hymn Fight the Good Fight was Sung, and the Rev AD Johnson dedicated the monument. The Rev AL Bradfield gave the Benediction and, after a volley of shots into the air, proceedings closed with the last post.

The tablets bearing 122 names were dedicated on Sunday, 12 November, 1950, by Canon AD Johnson, vicar of Christ Church, Oldham Road.

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