A-Z

Manchester Regiment Memorials

 

1854/1898

 

Horsfield Parish Church

Horsfield Parish Church, Sussex

Sacred to the memory of Lieutenant Colonel Exham Schomburg Turner Swyney 63rd Regt, who fell gallantly charging the Russians at the Battle of Inkermann Nov 5th 1854  and lies buried on Cathcarts Hill, deeply and deservedly
mourned by his Relatives and Friends,  as well as by his Brother Officers, and all who knew him.
This Tablet was erected by his bereaved Widow and Relatives as a slight Tribute of his worth and their affection, and in the firm hope that he who rests with the brave will also rise with the just.   ‘The Trumpet shall sound and the dead shall be raised’.

James Hulton Clutterbuck Panel

 

St Mary's Parish Church, Watford

Marble wall plaque on black marble base, surmounted with a wreath containing the words: Alma, Balaclava, Inkermann, Sebastapol. Sacred to the memory of James Hulton Clutteruck Ensign in H M 63rd (West Suffolk) Regiment of Foot
second son of: Robert Clutterbuck Esq of Watford House in this parish and Elizabeth Anne, his wife, youngest daughter of Henry Hulton Esq of Bevis Mount near Southampton. At the battle of Inkermann, He carried the Regimental Colour and fell mortally wounded whilst gallantly leading on his men, in the 20th year of his age "Thy Will Be Done"

George Walton Clutterbuck Panel

St Mary's Parish Church, Watford

Rectangular marble wall plaque. The inscription is surrounded by an oval laurel wreath fastened by a ribbon bow.

Sacred to the memory of George Watlington Clutterbuck, Captain in HM 63rd Regiment. Who died at Milan on the 26th February 1867 in the 31st year of his age. This tablet is erected by his brother officers in token of their deep regret.

St George's Chapel, Windsor

Marble wall plaque in side chapel To the memory of Major Thomas St l Fairtlough, of the 63rd Regiment of Foot who died at Windsor on November 13th 1820 and was struck down on the castle wall In commemoration of the esteem in which he was deservedly held etc.

Plaque marking the opening of the Ardwick drill hall in 1887

Ardwick Green Barracks, Manchester

Small stone commemorative plaque recording the opening of the drill hall on 30th September 1887 by HRH The Duke of Cambridge, Commander in Chief of the British Army. In wall at north end of ground floor corridor.

University Barracks, Manchester

Built into the inner face of the brick boundary wall and previously in the outer wall of the original drill hall (Completed 1882). Three carved stone plaques:

  1. The Sphinx
  2. A shield containing part of the Coat of Arms of Manchester, on a background of Spears and swords. Below are carved the words From Acorns Spring Oaks
  3. A circular plaque containing the words Sixth Lancashire's with a Queen's Crown on top. All backed by swords and spears. At the base a carved scroll - First Mancs Vols Rifles.
Benyon memorial Stetchworth Church, Cambridgeshire

Benyon memorial Stetchworth Church, Cambridgeshire

The memorial dedicated to Samuel Ashton Yate Benyon adorns the wall of Stetchworth Church in East Cambridgeshire. Ashton Benyon was a Lieutenant in the 63rd Regiment of Foot, and served in the Crimea where he contracted the illness that killed him, during the Siege of Sebastopol. He died on May 22nd 1856, a year after being sent home to recover. Upon the elaborate white marble memorial, depicting a woman weeping over the body of a bedded dead man, an inscription reads:


“ASHTON BENYON
BORN SEPTR 27TH 1836 DIED MAY 22ND 1856
HE DROOPED AND DIED
IN MANHOOD'S EARLY DAWN
APPROACHING DEATH
SUBDUED WITH SOLEMN SADNESS ALL THE PRIDE
OF YOUTHFUL STRENGTH AND SO HE BOWED HIS HEAD
AND SANK - TO RISE AGAIN!”


A further memorial is mounted on his father’s grave in the churchyard outside.

Patrick Quinn Headstone

 

Patrick Quinn Headstone, Newry, County Down, Ireland.

In Memory of Patrick Quinn 96th Regt who departed this life 2nd December 1861. Aged 29 years. May his soul rest in peace. Amen. Erected by his comrade James McCabe same Regt’

Stone wall memorial, commemorating Major John Lees and Captain Albert Harrop Lees

Parish Church of St Michael and All Angels, Ashton-under-Lyne

 

A fine stone wall memorial supported by two marble columns, commemorating Major John Lees and Captain Albert Harrop Lees of the 23rd Lancashire Rifle Volunteers of 1859. John Lees had been the first commanding officer of the corps. Carved at the base of the memorial are a volunteer officers’ uniform cap, sword and crossbelt.