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Trial “Pop-Up” Cycle Lane on the A635
Frequently Asked Questions

Question 1
Why remove the on-street parking facility and not just make the footpath wider to accommodate a shared area full length of the scheme?
Answer
The scheme is currently a temporary ‘pop-up’ cycle lane being paid for by funding from the government’s Active Travel fund in response to the coronavirus pandemic, to provide more socially distant travel options.  The scheme is being trialled to help people to travel safely whilst socially distancing.  If we were to increase the footpath width the costs would be significantly higher and we would not be able to implement the scheme as quickly.  During the trial, we will be asking for people to provide their feedback on whether the scheme should remain, be changed or removed altogether.  We therefore want to test the scheme out initially using materials and a design that can be changed and improved in the future if the scheme is successful.
 
Question 2
Why are you not introducing a “pop-up” cycle lane on the east bound route from Manchester City Centre to Ashton?
Answer
There are proposals to introduce a “pop-up” cycle lane on the eastbound carriage.  Plans are currently being developed.   If approved, the residents directly affected will be notified and confirmed plans will be shared on the Council’s dedicated walking and cycling webpage: https://www.tameside.gov.uk/safestreets/a635
 
Question 3
I am a blue badge holder and need to park outside my property. Can I still park there?
Answer
Unfortunately not as the cycle lane does not allow any parking within the segregated area.  It is primarily to provide a safe place for cyclists to travel.  If you are a blue badge holder please do get in touch so that we can discuss your specific concerns and requirements with you.
 
Question 4
I would like to install a driveway to my property. I want to drop the kerb at the front, does this scheme prevent this work from happening?
Answer
You are still able to apply to install a dropped kerb for a driveway in the normal way as you are still able to park on your driveway.  Please use the application procedure which can be found at:  www.tameside.gov.uk/kerbdropping.
 
Question 5
There are 5 bus stops on phase 2 of the cycle lane route. Are the bus timetables affected?
Answer
The bus timetables should not be affected as a result of this scheme but this will be monitored.
 
Question 6
The new cycle lane goes through the bus stops, who has right of way?
Answer
Cyclists should give way to the pedestrians boarding or disembarking from a bus. The modular system is put in place to extend the bus stop to allow a shared area on the platform.
 
Question 7
How will you decide whether the trial scheme has been successful?
Answer
Cycle volumes will be monitored using an automatic cycle counter along the route.  This will enable us to determine whether there has been a change in the amount of cyclists using the route after the trial pop-up cycle lane has been implemented.  Journey times and traffic volumes will also be monitored to see what effect the scheme has had on vehicular traffic along the route.  In addition, we will monitor the feedback we receive, via the online survey, from residents.
 

Active Neighbourhoods – Modal Filters
Frequently Asked Questions

Question 1
What is an Active Neighbourhood or Modal Filter?
Answer
This is a traffic management measure that will prevent the majority of motor vehicles from passing but will allow pedestrians and cyclists through.
The type of modal filter used will depend on the specific location but could involve the use of signage and / or physical restrictions such as bollards or planters.
Modal filters are generally placed in such a way that all types of motor vehicles can access properties along a road, but through-traffic is prevented.
 
Question 2
What are the benefits of introducing an Active Neighbourhood or Modal Filter?
Answer
Evidence shows that  cycling and walking journeys increase substantially when vehicular traffic is removed from residential streets.  This will result in an increase in active travel, and reduced pollution, making neighbourhoods nicer, healthier and safer places to live, travel and play.
The public health benefits are enormous and are needed now more than ever.
 
Question 3
Will the restrictions be 24 hours a day, 7 days a week?
Answer
Once implemented the majority of modal filters will be active 24 hours a day, seven days a week.  However, through consultation with local residents there may be locations where timed restrictions would be more suitable but of course these are more difficult to manage and enforce.
 
Question 4
How will you inform residents and businesses about any new schemes?
Answer
Due to the need to implement measures quickly, to protect public health and to improve safety, there is insufficient time to engage with local residents in detail before each scheme is implemented.  However, residents and businesses in close proximity to each scheme will be notified in advance.  There will also be advanced warning notices and signage placed on the affected streets.
Details of these schemes will be promoted in the local press and through social media.  If you are therefore not directly affected by the scheme but would like to provide feedback please do so by completing the online questionnaire at: https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/quieterandsaferstreetsinTameside before the 16 November 2020.
Unfortunately the Council does not have the resources to respond to all of the individual feedback but we will monitor this closely, taking action where appropriate, and will provide regular updates on any emerging issues and how these are being addressed.  We will also review and update this list of frequently asked questions on a regular basis.
 
Question 5
How and when will the schemes be implemented?
Answer
The schemes will be introduced using Experimental Traffic Orders, which can remain in force for up to 18 months.  This time period forms the statutory consultation period, during which time changes can be made to the scheme.  Further data collection and consultation with residents will take place during this period to evaluate the effectiveness of the scheme and to help determine whether the measures need to be changed, removed or made permanent.
 
Question 6
How will you assess the effectiveness of the measures?
Answer
The immediate objective during the current pandemic is to install temporary schemes that aid social distancing and that create safe conditions for walking and cycling.  This is a based on guidance from central government.
When we implement a scheme to improve an area for walking and cycling we monitor the effect on traffic in the surrounding area.
A successful scheme is one where the benefits of the changes outweigh any negatives, taking into consideration factors such as traffic volume and speed, air pollution and community feedback. 
 
Question 7
I am a business with regular deliveries by a large vehicle, how will these deliveries be affected?
Answer
Direct access to all properties will be maintained, but the restrictions may require a different route to be taken to get to your property.  This initiative will also present an opportunity for you to review your deliveries to see if you could reduce the frequency or change the method of delivery.  This will also contribute to reducing traffic, thereby helping to make this type of scheme a success.
 
Question 8
Does this mean that I have to drive a lot further and down busy roads – causing more pollution?
Answer
There will always be some essential journeys that people need to make by vehicle.  However, the transport choices that we make have a direct impact on local communities.
Some car journeys may need to be diverted to avoid the modal filter.  For longer journeys, the difference in route will be minimal in the context of the overall trip.  In some cases, drivers may see an improvement because they will not have to wait in a queue on their own street.
Some local journeys by car may take a few minutes more but we believe that this is a small inconvenience, balanced against potentially significant improvements to safety and public health.  Now, because of the pandemic, those safety and health benefits are needed more than ever.
 
Question 9
How will emergency services be affected by the measures?
Answer
The emergency services (ambulance, police and the fire brigade) will be consulted during the design phase for each scheme and they will have the opportunity to comment.  Emergency access will be retained in all cases.
 
Question 10
Will the scheme have an impact on my bins being emptied?
Answer
Depending on the layout of your street, the bin lorry will either be able to drive through the restriction, reverse down the street (as they already do in many places) or turn around.  Arrangements will be made to ensure your bin collection is not negatively affected.
 
Question 11
Will the Council consider making these measures permanent?
Answer
There may be an appetite amongst residents for some of the measures that are being put in place to be retained on a more permanent basis to help improve quality of life for local residents.  Where these measures help to facilitate walking and cycling, this would be in line with the Council’s longer term objectives and so this will be considered on a case by case basis.
 
Question 12
Will the Council be adding further modal filters?
Answer
This will be subject to the availability of funding and on any feedback received relating to the schemes introduced to date.
Locations will be prioritised based on a range of criteria including traffic volumes, footway widths, proximity to key facilities and the volume of requests.


COVID-19 Temporary Physical Distancing Plans
Frequently Asked Questions

Question 1

Where is the money coming from to pay for these temporary walking and cycling improvements?

Answer

The funding for these temporary measures will be drawn from the Greater Manchester Mayor’s Challenge Fund (MCF) which is currently funding the Bee Network.  The Bee Network is a plan to make Greater Manchester an easier place for people to get around on foot or by bike.  The grant funding is specifically designated for cycling and walking improvements and cannot therefore be used for anything else.  If this allocation was not spent in Tameside for this purpose the money would be spent elsewhere in Greater Manchester.

 

Question 2

What temporary measures are being introduced?

Answer

The temporary measures are part of the Greater Manchester #SafeStreetSavesLives campaign in response to a Government drive to create enhanced shared spaces during the coronavirus lockdown and through recovery.  Tameside’s plans align with statutory guidance and the proposals include, for example,  the introduction of key worker corridors, extended footpaths to enable social distancing outside shops and other key destinations, the creation of crossings and access only “quiet” streets.  Information on the emerging plans can be found at: www.tameside.gov.uk/travelsafe

 

Question 3

Will there be an impact on the Bee Network schemes that the Council consulted on in February 2020?

Answer

No, these measures are an immediate response to the coronavirus epidemic to enable people to walk and cycle safely for exercise and essential journeys whilst following social distancing guidelines. We are continuing to work on delivering the Bee Network schemes to provide safe spaces for our residents to walk and cycle offering a genuine alternative to the cars and in the short term public transport.

 

Question 4

Are the new schemes being implemented for Covid-19 temporary or permanent?

Answer

Some of the smaller changes, including the removal of unnecessary street furniture to provide more space on the footway, could be permanent.  However, more significant changes that involve the use of experimental Traffic Orders are initially temporary and could be in place for up to 6 months.  During that time the Council has the ability to make changes to ensure that the scheme best meets the needs of road users and the local community.  The effectiveness of all temporary measures will be evaluated and this will involve consultation with residents.  After 6-months, a decision will be taken to decide whether the scheme should be removed or made permanent.

Question 5

Can you make these changes without consultation?

Answer

These measures are intended to be a response to the Covid-19 pandemic, in which we’ve seen walking and cycling playing a bigger role for essential journeys and exercise, with road traffic falling significantly. 

Highway authorities have the necessary powers to close or re-purpose road space on an emergency, experimental or temporary basis. This can be done using certain measures such as line markings and ‘light-segregation’ which are instant or legal orders that can be implemented subject to due process. The Department for Transport has amended guidance on the use of Traffic Regulation Orders during the lockdown.
Having said that we understand the importance of involving our residents in our plans.  We welcome any feedback and views in order to build on the existing proposals and work together to make any permanent changes to make our borough more walking and cycling friendly.  Please provide your feedback by visiting www.tameside.gov.uk/travelsafe 

 

Question 6

Will the temporary measures introduced be safety checked?

Answer

Any measures introduced will comply with the relevant Health and Safety regulations. We understand that safety is a primary concern, especially for people who are returning to cycling after a long time.  Simple changes, designating space within the carriageway for cyclists, can be a cost effective way of improving safety and encouraging more people to consider cycling for shorter journeys.’

 

Question 7

When will the new schemes be ready to use?

Answer

We now know that social distancing measures are likely to be in place until at least the end of 2020.  So in order to support people to continue making  sustainable travel choices and enable them to do so in the safest way possible, we’ve come together with other Greater Manchester Authorities to discuss what will work best for our residents based on Government guidance and will implement changes as quickly as possible.  The introduction of new temporary cycle and walking routes is seen as a key priority to enable people to travel safely as lockdown eases.  Timescales for works to begin will be made available on: www.tameside.gov.uk/safestreets

 

Question 8

Why are you removing guard rails which provide safety?

Answer

  • Guardrailing is used to control the movement of pedestrians within the highway.  This is most commonly associated with encouraging pedestrians to cross the road at a more appropriate location.  It can also be used to prevent pedestrians from straying into the road inadvertently and occasionally to reduce the risk of pedestrians being struck by the swept path of large vehicles.  Guardrailing is also sometimes used to prevent vehicles from parking on the footway but this is generally not seen as good practice and an alternative solution should be found.
  • Guardrails are not designed or constructed to protect pedestrians against the impact of a vehicle.
  • Guardrailing can also have adverse effects, including safety, footway capacity and convenience for pedestrians, and in terms of the visual appearance of the street.  In terms of safety, guardrailing can sometimes encourage pedestrians to cross at less safe locations and can cause them to become trapped on the carriageway.  Guardrailing can also impact the safety of cyclists by blocking an emergency route away from vehicles.
  • In general, it is recommended that guardrailing is installed only where it is considered absolutely necessary, and that unnecessary guardrailing should be removed.  This includes where the original justification may no longer be relevant, for example where a school entrance has been removed or relocated.
  • Guidance from the Department for Transport states that “Guardrail or fencing to channel pedestrians to the designated crossing may be deemed necessary on busy roads.  However, their use should only be considered where the risks of walking onto the carriageway are very high, as they have a number of disadvantages.  They are visually intrusive, reduce footway width, can obscure children, and can cause access difficulties to commercial premises.”
  • Given the recent importance placed on the available footway width, in particular to support social distancing, the need for guardrail is being assessed in a number of areas.  There is no proposal to remove guardrailing where there is a strong justification, such as at the exits from schools or busy play areas.

 

Question 9

Will the works affect traffic?

Answer

As with any construction works taking place on the highway there will inevitably be some disruption.  This will however be kept to a minimum.  Any lane closures or diversions will be communicated in advance and clearly signposted. 

 

Question 10

What if the schemes you are introducing do not work?

Answer

If the temporary schemes implemented do not work then changes will be considered to improve their effectiveness or a decision could be taken to remove the scheme altogether.  This is one of the benefits of trialling experimental schemes initially.  Input from residents is therefore important in helping to evaluate whether a temporary scheme has been successful.

 

Question 11

Why does the Council want to increase the number of people walking and cycling in the Borough?

Answer

Surveys have told us that cycling journeys have increased by 42% during lockdown.   We need to sustain and increase this number as the lockdown is eased. Not only is walking and cycling the safer option for travel as lockdown restrictions are eased, but helping more people to be more active, more often is the most valuable way in which we can improve the physical and mental health of people living in Tameside. 
In Tameside, it is estimated that we spend £26m per annum in avoidable costs to the health system. This is due to treating people for illnesses that could have been prevented if people were more physically active.  When you couple that with the fact that 30% of trips under 1km in Greater Manchester are made by car, the equivalent of 15 minutes walking or 4 minutes cycling, the benefits and need for an improved system becomes instantly clear.  Not only is walking and cycling good for our health and will reduce pressures on our services, but it reduces congestion and improves air quality too. It helps connect communities together, gives people more opportunities for work and supports a wider choice of activities for rest and play. 

Walking and cycling have been shown to be the easiest activities for people to start moving more, whatever their age or ability level. 

People have told us that the main thing stopping them from enjoying a bike ride or going for a walk is that they don’t feel safe enough on our existing roads and crossings.  We want to help people feel comfortable and confident enough to enjoy travelling on foot or by bike.  The new temporary infrastructure will support more people to do just that.   

 

Question 12

People do not cycle in Tameside so why are you spending money on temporary infrastructure that will never be used?

Answer

Many people already cycle in and around Tameside.  People have told us that more would like to ride their bikes if they felt safer and the routes were better connected.  Some ways we can help people feel safer are to have more options to ride on lanes that are separated from traffic on busy roads, routes that go through quiet backstreets, and those that cross through attractive green places like parks, countryside, and along our many waterways. 

By improving existing routes and joining up gaps in the network we can help more people make a complete journey more easily, and importantly, more safely.

 

Question 13

I would like to use the new cycling routes but I have not ridden a bike for years and would not have the confidence to cycle alongside traffic.  Are there any schemes to help people like me gain the confidence I need?

Answer

Training sessions are available from TfGM for people who want to learn to ride a bike safely or to get out on the road.  These sessions are run for individuals or families and can be booked by visiting https://tfgm.com/cycling/training.

For those who wish to learn to ride away from traffic there is also the Tameside Cycle Circuit visit: www.activetameside.com/activity/cycle-circuit  for more information.

For further information and ways you can get into cycling, visit www.tameside.gov.uk/cycling

 

Question 14

Where can I go for more information or provide a suggestion for my area?

Answer

For more information on walking and cycling in Tameside, please visit www.tameside.gov.uk/walkingandcycling
To have your say and make any suggestions for improvements to walking and cycling in Tameside, please www.tameside.gov.uk/safestreets or you can find more information at tfgm.com/safestreets.

 
 

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